The Folger Shakespeare Library

Rumors of Royalty follows the story of the “Glorious Revolution” through English printed material and the private avvisi, or newsletters, of a Florentine diplomat. This site is a collaboration between the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., and the Medici Archive Project in Florence, Italy. For more information about the Italian documents featured on this site, please visit Bia, the digital portal to the Medici Archive Project’s collection.  The site is made possible through generous support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, as part of the initiative to develop the Miranda digital asset platform at the Folger.

Folger Shakespeare Library: Sophie Byvik, Stacey Redick, Abbie Weinberg.

Medici Archive Project: Dr. Alessio Assonitis, Dr. Maurizio Arfaioli.

 

hover

hover

Bibliography

Barclay, Andrew. “Mary [Mary of Modena] (1658–1718), queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, consort of James II and VII.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/18247

Claydon, Tony. “William III and II (1650–1702), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and prince of Orange.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/29450 

Glassey, Lionel K.J. “In search of the Mot Juste: Characterizations of the Revolution of 1688-89″ in The Final Crisis of the Stuart Monarchy: The Revolutions of 1688-91 in their British, Atlantic and European Contexts, edited by Tim Harris and Stephen Taylor. Woodbridge, Suffolk: The Boydell Press, 2013.

Gregg, Edward. “Anne (1665–1714), queen of Great Britain and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2012. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/560

Gregg, Edward. “James Francis Edward [James Francis Edward Stuart; styled James; known as Chevalier de St George, the Pretender, the Old Pretender] (1688–1766), Jacobite claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2012. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/14594 

Harol, Corrinne. “Misconceiving the Heir: Mind and Matter in the Warming Pan Propaganda” in Vital Matters: Eighteenth-Century Views of Conception, Life, and Death, ed. Helen Deutsch & Mary Terrall. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Hartley, Craig and Catharine MacLeod. “Supposititious Prints.” Print Quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 1 (March 1989), p. 49-54.

Kishlansky, Mark, & John Morrill. “Charles I (1600–1649), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/5143

Miller, John. “Anne [née Anne Hyde], duchess of York (1637–1671), first wife of James II.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/14325

Morrill, John. “Cromwell, Oliver (1599–1658), lord protector of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2015. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/6765

Schwoerer, Lois. “Propaganda in the Revolution of 1688-89.” The American Historical Review, Vol. 82, No. 4 (Oct., 1977), p. 843-874.

Seaward, Paul. “Charles II (1630–1685), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2011. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/5144

Speck, W. A. “James II and VII (1633–1701), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2009. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/14593 

Speck, W. A. “Mary II (1662–1694), queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2012. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/18246

Weil, Rachel J. “The Politics of Legitimacy: Woman and the Warming-Pan Scandal” in The Revolution of 1688-89: Changing Perspectives, ed. Lois Schwoerer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Wormald, Jenny. “James VI and I (1566–1625), king of Scotland, England, and Ireland.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2014. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/14592

Wynne, S. M. “Catherine [Catherine of Braganza, Catarina Henriqueta de Bragança] (1638–1705), queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland, consort of Charles II.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 2008. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/4894

Return to the home page to read the story of the Glorious Revolution from the beginning.